Editorial: The System of Information Architecture

Gears

Peter Morville

Seeing a system as something different from the sum of its parts and more out of control than most realize resonates with my experience as an information architect. We who labor at the crossroads of structure and behavior have learned the hard way that content management is far messier than garbage collection and “the system always kicks back.”

Issue 2, Vol. 3
Fall 2011

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Architectures

Five Years

Jorge Arango

The end product of information architecture can be many different things: a website, a movie, a book, a game such as chess, the location of products in supermarkets. Indeed, as more of these cultural artifacts become digital, their purely informational nature is becoming more prominent.

Issue 1, Vol. 3
Spring 2011

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Editorial: An Information Architect by Any Other Name

Two Decorative Posts

Eric Reiss

The mere fact that you are reading this Journal tells me you’re different. You will inherit the earth. Not because you are meek, but because you recognize the importance of information architecture.

Issue 2, Vol. 2
Fall 2010

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Maturing a Practice

Three Monkeys

Hobbs, Fenn, & Resmini

This paper aims to discuss the position of the traditional usability model in the context of current technical interaction, and in particular in internet interaction. The traditional usability model was developed in the context of software development. Yet it is relevant to IA for two reasons: firstly, on the internet information design and retrieval (IR) benefits from its application just as much as software development did, due its vast user base. Secondly, large parts of the internet are application or software driven by now. At the same time, the interplay of information and applications on the internet has produced new ways of interaction, and new demands towards the quality of interaction. Consequently, the traditional usability model needs to be expanded beyond an entirely functional focus, to accommodate the richer notion of the user experience. This article then inquires how an expanded understanding of emotions can support such an enriched usability model.

Issue 1, Vol. 2
Spring 2010

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From Prediction to Emergence

Relationship

Brigitte Kaltenbacher

This paper aims to discuss the position of the traditional usability model in the context of current technical interaction, and in particular in internet interaction. The traditional usability model was developed in the context of software development. Yet it is relevant to IA for two reasons: firstly, on the internet information design and retrieval (IR) benefits from its application just as much as software development did, due its vast user base. Secondly, large parts of the internet are application or software driven by now. At the same time, the interplay of information and applications on the internet has produced new ways of interaction, and new demands towards the quality of interaction.Consequently, the traditional usability model needs to be expanded beyond an entirely functional focus, to accommodate the richer notion of the user experience. This article then inquires how an expanded understanding of emotions can support such an enriched usability model.

Issue 2, Vol. 1
Fall 2009

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Editorial: Shall We Dance?

Georgian Dance

Dorte Madsen

But where is the research in information architecture? (...) You may come across research involving information architecture or relevant for information architecture, but not necessarily written with a specific purpose of developing the field of information architecture, of adding to the body of knowledge about information architecture, developing concepts for information architecture, nor in general addressing the theoretical foundations of information architecture. Now, with a Journal of Information Architecture, we have a forum where we can publish what is central to the development of the field of information architecture.

Issue 1, Vol. 1
Spring 2009

Table of Contents


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